Who Doesn’t Like Extra Credit?

And this blog post will be about J-Schools Play Catchup from the New York Times.

Essentially, the article is about how journalism departments are changing to adapt to the way journalism is changing in the face of the rising web presence today. And fittingly enough, I read this article online, instead of in a newspaper. Which is a nice real life example of how the web is changing journalism.

It seems like the main change going through the journalism schools mentioned is that they are broadening their subject matter. Journalism students are learning more about the web, learning more about video, gaining more skills. “All media becomes one,” says Jeff Jarvis. And it does. Everything ends up on the web, where everyone can find it. And with that, journalism is becoming more universal.

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citizen journalism

Aaaand today I will be blogging about this article: social networking sites share breaking news because Angie said I have to. 😛 Its for Mass Comm Tech class.

Basically, the article is about how facebook and twitter enable people to post or read news updates before the big news groups can get that news out there. Examples include photos of the plane landing in the Hudson River or the earthquake in Southern California last summer.

After reading this article, I’ve decided that my new goal is to be one of those people who takes a picture of some breaking news and gets it online before the major news coorporations (and then subsequently causes the image-hosting server to crash due to too many pageviews, haha). Pretty much I’m just going to start lurking around places where I think breaking news might well, break.

If I were a journalism major, I think I might be a little concerned by how this might affect the future of journalism. I don’t think it will eliminate the need for cnn and newspapers, but I think it does require some cognizance of the changing modes of communication. Interestingly enough, some papers are already pursuing these different forms of news reporting, such as the Philadelphia Inquirer, which has its own Twitter account. I think that’s really cool.